Barriers and facilitators to pressure ulcer prevention behaviours by older people living in their own homes and their lay carers: A qualitative study

Jennifer Roddis*, Judith Dyson, Marjolein Woodhouse, Anne Devrell, Karen Oakley, Fiona Cowdell

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Objective: To identify barriers and facilitators to pressure ulcer (PU) prevention behaviours in
    community dwelling older people and their lay carers.
    Design: Theoretically informed qualitative interviews with two phase, deductive then inductive
    thematic analysis.
    Setting: The study was conducted in one geographical region in the United Kingdom, spanning
    several community NHS Trusts.
    Participants: Community dwelling older patients at risk of pressure ulcer development (n=10) and their lay carers (n=10).
    Results: Six themes and subthemes were identified: i) knowledge and beliefs about consequences (nature, source, timing and taboo), ii) social and professional role and influences (who does what, conflicting advice and disagreements), iii) motivation and priorities (competing self-care needs and carer physical ability), iv) memory, v) emotion (carer exhaustion and isolation, carer role versus partner role and patient feelings) and vi) environment (human resource and response, and equipment).
    Conclusions: There is minimal research in pressure ulcer prevention in community dwelling older people. This study has robustly applied the theoretical domains framework to understanding barriers and facilitators to pressure ulcer prevention behaviours. Our findings will support co-design of strategies to promote preventative behaviours and are likely to be transferable to comparable health care systems nationally and internationally.
    Strengths and limitations
    ● A structured theoretical approach was adopted to data collection and analysis Both
    inductive and deductive understandings of barriers and facilitators to PU prevention
    behaviours were gained, leading to a detailed analysis of influencing factors
    ● Service users were involved in the design, analysis and reporting of this research
    ● Recruitment was undertaken in a single geographical area.
    Original languageEnglish
    Article numbere080398
    JournalBMJ Open
    Volume14
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished (VoR) - 18 Mar 2024

    Keywords

    • Pressure ulcer prevention, older people, community, barriers and facilitators

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