British urban reconstruction after the Second World War: the rise of planning and the issue of 'non-planning'

Peter J. Larkham

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Throughout urban history, settlements have been subject to a range of catastrophes, both natural and human. The manner in which settlements recover ? if they do at all ? is of considerable academic and practical interest. Much of the research carried out has been more focused on the socio-economic consequences of the catastrophe, or on the socio-economic, political and even bureaucratic processes of reconstruction. In almost all cases, the reconstruction is ?planned? in one form or another. Nevertheless, it is instructive to consider one such period of intensive planning, during and shortly after the Second World War, as the context to the concept of ?non-plan? which originated in the late 1960s, towards the end of the ?reconstruction era?. For ?non-plan? could be seen as a product of too much planning, ineffective planning, or inappropriate delivery of plans.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)20-31
    Number of pages12
    JournalArchitektura a Urbanizmus
    VolumeLIV
    Issue number1-2
    Publication statusPublished (VoR) - 1 Oct 2020

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