Coffee and Caffeine Ingestion Have Little Effect on Repeated Sprint Cycling in Relatively Untrained Males

Neil Clarke*, Harry Baxter, Emmanuel Fajemilua, Victoria Jones, Samuel Oxford, Darren Richardson, Charlotte Wyatt, Peter Mundy

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    7 Citations (SciVal)

    Abstract

    The present study investigated the effect of ingesting caffeine-dose-matched anhydrous caffeine or coffee on the performance of repeated sprints. Twelve recreationally active males (mean ± SD age: 22 ± 2 years, height: 1.78 ± 0.07 m, body mass: 81 ± 16 kg) completed eighteen 4 s sprints with 116 s recovery on a cycle ergometer on four separate occasions in a double-blind, randomised, counterbalanced crossover design. Participants ingested either 3 mg·kg−1 of caffeine (CAF), 0.09 g·kg−1 coffee, which provided 3 mg·kg−1 of caffeine (COF), a taste-matched placebo beverage (PLA), or a control condition (CON) 45 min prior to commencing the exercise protocol. Peak and mean power output and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were recorded for each sprint. There were no significant differences in peak power output (CAF: 949 ± 199 W, COF: 949 ± 174 W, PLA: 971 ± 149 W and CON: 975 ± 170 W; p = 0.872; η2P = 0.02) or mean power output (CAF: 873 ± 172 W, COF: 862 ± 44 W, PLA: 887 ± 119 W and CON: 892 ± 143 W; p = 0.819; η2P = 0.03) between experimental conditions. Mean RPE was similar for all trials (CAF: 11 ± 2, COF: 11 ± 2, PLA: 11 ± 2 and CON: 11 ± 2; p = 0.927; η2P = 0.01). Neither the ingestion of COF or CAF improved repeated sprint cycling performance in relatively untrained males.
    Original languageEnglish
    Article number45
    JournalSports
    Volume4
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished (VoR) - 29 Aug 2016

    Keywords

    • caffeine
    • coffee
    • repeated sprints
    • cycling

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