Diffractive Enquiries for new temporalities of learning in Higher Education

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

    Abstract

    This chapter considers how diffractive enquires (DE) enrich pedagogical practices for teaching and learning within the disrupted temporalities of contemporary Higher Education (HE). Human, material and environmental inequalities are the consequence of dominant modes of human knowledge making, production and consumption within which HE is implicated through socio-economic, historical, cultural and pedagogical practices. Pedagogies organised within linear, binary logics maintaining inequalities of access and engagement are disrupted by DE shift to see the world as deeply relational and entangled. Through re-configured temporal concepts of spacetimematter and re-turn, I show how DE are fluid, affective, experiential pedagogies of response-able knowledge making, paying attention to different relationalities across structural and symbolic inequalities. These proliferate multiple ways of knowing and practising in HE. DE’s commitment to ‘staying-with’ troubling concerns, opening and expanding rather than reflecting back, spurs responses of care and hope necessary to fulfil HE’s promise for (re)making liveable worlds through its teaching and learning. Through examples of student explorations of space, time and matter in Education I show how using multi-modal texts, theoretical and experiential insights are diffracted through each other, generating multiple perspectives and provoking new conversations. These encourage responses of empathy and imagination, rather than solution and resolve.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationReclaiming the teaching discourse in Higher Education: Curating a diversity of theory and practice
    PublisherRoutledge
    Chapter11
    Publication statusIn preparation - 2024

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