The effects of co-infection with human parvovirus B19 and Plasmodium falciparum on type and degree of anaemia in Ghanaian children

Kwabena Obeng Duedu*, Kwamena William Coleman Sagoe, Patrick Ferdinand Ayeh-Kumi, Raymond Bedu Affrim, Theophilus Adiku

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    15 Citations (SciVal)

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVE: To determin the extent to which parvovirus B19 (B19V) and co-infection of B19V and malaria contribute to risk of anaemia in children. METHODS: B19V DNA and malaria parasites were screened for 234 children at the PML Children's Hospital in Accra. The role of B19V and co-infection with B19V and malaria in anaemia was evaluated by analysing full blood cell counts, malaria and B19V DNA results from these children. RESULTS: The prevalence of B19V, malaria and co-infection with B19V and malaria was 4.7%, 41.9% and 2.6%, respectively. Malaria posed a greater risk in the development of mild anaemia compared to severe anaemia (OR=5.28 vrs 3.15) whereas B19V posed a higher risk in the development of severe anaemia compared to mild anaemia (OR=4.07 vrs 1.00) from a non-anaemic child. Persons with co-infection with B19V and malaria had 2.23 times the risk (95% CI=0.40-12.54) of developing severe anaemia should they already have a mild anaemia. The degree of anaemia was about three times affected by co-infection (Pillai's trace=0.551, P=0.001) as was affected by malaria alone (Pillai's trace=0.185, P=0.001). B19V alone did not significantly affect the development of anaemia in a non-anaemic child. Microcytic anaemia was associated with B19V and co-infection with B19V and malaria more than normocytic normochromic anaemia. CONCLUSIONS: B19V was associated with malaria in cases of severe anaemia. The association posed a significant risk for exacerbation of anaemia in mild anaemic children. B19V and co-infection with B19V and malaria may be associated with microcytic anaemia rather than normocytic normochromic anaemia as seen in cases of B19V infection among persons with red cell abnormalities.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)129-139
    Number of pages11
    JournalAsian Pac J Trop Biomed
    Volume3
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished (VoR) - Feb 2013

    Funding

    We thank the following people who contributed to the provision of logistics for this study; Mr Emmanuel Ekow Biney, Clinical Laboratory Unit, Ghana Health Service; Prof. Max Q. Arens, Department of Paediatrics, School of Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, USA; Dr. Daniel Candotti, National Health Service, Blood and Transplant Centre, University of Cambridge and Dr. Charles B. Duedu, University of Cape Coast. We also thank Dr. C. Enworenu-Laryea and Prof. J.A.A. Mingle, University of Ghana Medical School for their advice on the proposal and manuscript as well as Rev. Tom Ndanu and David Nana Adjei, College of Health Sciences, University of Ghana for the guidance on statistical analysis. The project was supported in part by the University of Ghana College of Health Sciences Postgraduate Research Grant (Ref: CHS/AA/BC.?a). *Corresponding author: Kwabena Obeng Duedu, Institute of Cell Biology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, UK. Tel: +?? 7577 152176 E-mail: [email protected]; [email protected] Foundation Project: Financially supported by University of Ghana College of Health Sciences Postgraduate Research Grant (Ref: CHS/AA/BC.?a).

    FundersFunder number
    CHS/AA/BC
    University of Ghana College of Health Sciences

      Keywords

      • Anaemia
      • Children
      • Ghana
      • Human parvovirus B19
      • Malaria

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