The impact of a school-based gardening intervention on intentions and behaviour related to fruit and vegetable consumption in children

Michael J. Duncan*, Emma Eyre, Elizabeth Bryant, Neil Clarke, Samantha Birch, Victoria Staples, David Sheffield

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    38 Citations (SciVal)

    Abstract

    Seventy-seven children (34 boys, 43 girls, Mean age ± SD = 9 ± 1 years) participated in this study. Forty-six children (intervention) undertook a 12 week school gardening programme and 31 children acted as controls. Measures of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) and fruit and vegetable consumption were taken pre and post intervention. Repeated measures analysis of variance and hierarchical regression analysis indicated that the intervention group increased daily consumption of fruit and vegetables and increased intentions, attitudes, norms, PBC related to fruit and vegetable consumption. Attitudes, norms and PBC significantly predicted changes in fruit and vegetable consumption.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)765-773
    Number of pages9
    JournalJournal of Health Psychology
    Volume20
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished (VoR) - 4 Jun 2015

    Funding

    This research was partly funded by a grant from the Tanita Healthy Weight Trust. We would also like to thank Keeley Thomas for her guidance on setting up a school garden at the outset of this project.

    FundersFunder number
    Tanita Healthy Weight Trust

      Keywords

      • Theory of Planned Behaviour
      • intervention
      • diet
      • gardening
      • primary schools

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